Unity in Migrant Farmworkers from 1960–1985

It is nearly impossible to discuss migrant farmworkers without first contextualizing the roots of the movement. The farmworker movement owes a great deal to Chicano activists and the community, as it was born there, and has only expanded outwards to encompass marginalized farm workers from other ethnic backgrounds who face similar issues.

The Chicano Movement

The Chicano movement was a reaction to decades of discrimination in Southwestern United States. Discrimination against Mexican- Americans began after the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, where Mexicans on the piece of land covered by the Mexican Cession…


There are four categories of immigration statuses within the United States: US citizens, permanent residents, non-immigrants (temporary visa holders), and undocumented immigrants. The US census only includes citizens, permanent residents, and undocumented immigrants, notably excluding temporary visa holders, which can include students and professionals (Mejer, 2021). A point to note is that the census data does not account for the actual number of undocumented immigrants (Shanahan, 2020).

The immigrant population is broken into:

· Citizens, who are naturalized through the process of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA)

· Legal permanent residents that includes refugees, employment- based immigrants, and immigrants…


Welcoming America and Georgia Welcoming Cities

Welcoming America is a network that has taken steps towards creating a more inclusive environment for immigrants. Welcoming network provides a roadmap and support to help all residents, including immigrants take part in economic, civic, and social life in their communities.

A large focus of this paper is the potentially more positive outcomes of immigrants that live in welcoming cities because the city took action to ensure that it was a safe, welcoming place for immigrants, and that it allowed accommodations for immigrants.

According to Welcoming America’s framework as articulated through their Welcoming Cities…


Perfect English Should be an Option, not an Expectation

Hearing “You’re in America, speak English” is almost a rite of passage for immigrants, and it is said by xenophobes who object to immigrants’ presence within the US. The direct implication is that immigrants are only acceptable when they are speaking English. Even historically, immigrants have been expected to rapidly integrate themselves in social and civic life in their adopted countries. …


The idea that immigrants should attempt to speak their adopted country’s language “perfectly” is inherently xenophobic: it follows the expectation that immigrants should assimilate in America. The idea of “perfect,” is not about grammar, rather, it is about how natives speak. There are multitudes of courses and options marketed as allowing immigrants to speak like natives, which touches on how aspirational it is to sound like a native. Furthermore, by establishing natives as a baseline for “perfect”, there is an inherent assumption that immigrants are flawed. The idea that immigrants are flawed and education has deep roots in American history…


This is such an interesting follow up on the Jus Soli and Jus Sanguinis note.

(not my graphic, source: Quartz Youyou Zhou)


I recently learned about the ways that transdisciplinary research can connect fields. “Transdisciplinarity integrates the natural, social and health sciences in a humanities context, and transcends their traditional boundaries.” It involves a seamless integration of research, policy and actions to reach the desired outcome, and desired outcomes that most benefit the target audience.

This emerging field has great implications for the integration of studying refugees and ecological contexts. Environmental migration has been a pressing concern for the past 20 years given the rapidly changing climate and the world. …


Since January 8th, the world has been saying “Driver’s License” a tad bit more than usual (thanks Olivia Rodrigo). The American Driver’s license exam comes as an annoyance to many teens that grit their teeth while shifting their parents’ cars into reverse on their 20th parallel parking attempt.

Through these minor annoyances, the driver’s license test presents a fundamental barrier for non English speaking immigrants trying to start their lives in America. …


I read something fascinating not two days ago, many historians consider forced migration an ahistorical field. It is well acknowledged that migration was crucial in the creation of the spread of innovation and people throughout Europe and the Americas in the 15th through 18th centuries. As Americans, it is further cemented that migration is crucial by the beautiful Statue of Liberty that cements America as a historical nation of immigrants. It seems glossed over to not discuss the narratives of the displaced throughout history. Forced migration has been a product of political quests for power and land, as well as…


Kitgum refugee camps in Northern Uganda were the site of an first test of the efficacy of mosquito nets. It is a home for refugees from Burundi, DRC, Rwanda, Kenya and South Sudan, and it hosted more than 60,000 people last year.

In areas where there is a high population density, there are many more blood hosts for mosquitoes and hence mosquito-borne diseases are likely to spread quickly. This makes it paramount to invest in pest management programs. The other areas that are densely populated often include cities, where there is a separate portion of a city budget dedicated to…

Kavita Kar

Quarantine has me reminiscing about the lab. Also, I got recruited into an MLM a week ago, so I’m proud.

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